| 
  • If you are citizen of an European Union member nation, you may not use this service unless you are at least 16 years old.

  • Files spread between Dropbox, Google Drive, Gmail, Slack, and more? Dokkio, a new product from the PBworks team, integrates and organizes them for you. Try it for free today.

View
 

BCRN Seminar Wiki

This version was saved 7 years, 12 months ago View current version     Page history
Saved by ayala_arad@haas.berkeley.edu
on February 27, 2012 at 6:20:54 pm
 

 

 

    Multidisciplinary Perspectives

    on the Study of Behavior Change

    

 

 

Behaviors such as overeating, smoking, drinking, physical inactivity, or excessive risk taking are often difficult to change, and changing such behaviors can lead to substantial improvements in well-being and health. We will explore factors involved in behavior change from a broad multidisciplinary perspective. This class provides a rare and exciting opportunity for students to meet leading scholars from different fields (business, computer sciences, economics, neuroscience, psychology, psychiatry, public health) on and off the Berkeley campus who will present their work as it relates to the study of behavior change. Topics of interest include emotion, motivation, cognition, decision-making, well-being, health, and social networks with a special developmental focus on adolescence and late life. Speakers will give a 45-minute presentation that will be open to the public. After a brief period for questions and answers, there will be an in-depth discussion limited to the class. Readings will include those related to each speaker’s work and that provide a background understanding of the topic. Students will prepare discussion questions for each speaker.

 

This seminar is organized and sponsored by the Behavior Change Research Network.

Select talks (*) are sponsored by the Institute of Human Development

 

 

Seminar Schedule

 

  • January 23:  Welcome & Introduction 

          Location:  9 Durant Hall

          Time:  2-4 pm

 

  • January 30:  Robert W. Levenson, UC-Berkeley

          Title:  Emotional Functioning and Age: Some Surprising Changes

          Location:  9 Durant Hall

          Time:  2-4 pm

          Related Papers:

Shiota, M. N., & Levenson, R. W. (2009). Effects of aging on experimentally instructed detached reappraisal, positive reappraisal, and emotional behavior suppression. Psychology and Aging, 24, 890-900. Shiota_Levenson_2009.pdf

Carstensen, L. L., Mikels, J. A., & Mather, M. (2006). Aging and the intersection of cognition, motivation, and emotion. In J. E. Birren & K. W. Schaie (2006). Handbook of the psychology of aging (6th ed., pp. 343-362). Amsterdam, Netherlands: Elsevier. Carstensen_Mikels_Mather_2006.pdf

Host: Claudia M. Haase

 

  • February 6:  John Canny, UC-Berkeley 

          Title: Dialog, Narrative, and Behavior Change 

          Location:  9 Durant Hall

          Time:  2-4 pm

          Related Papers:

Ramachandran, D., Canny, J., Dutta Das, P., & Cutrell, E. (2010). Mobile-izing health workers in rural India. Proc. 2010 ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, 1879-1888. Ramachandran, Canny, Dutta Das & Cutrell (2010).pdf

Ramachandran, D., & Canny, J. (2008). The Persuasive Power of Human-Machine Dialog. Proc. Third International Conference on Persuasive Technology (Persuasive 2008), Springer Lecture notes in Computer Science 5033/2008, Oulu, Finland.  Ramachandra & Canny 2008.pdf  

Host: Jeff Spielberg

 

  • February 13:  Nancy Adler, UC-San Francisco

          Title: Health Disparities: What's Behavior Got To Do With It?  

          Location:  9 Durant Hall

          Time:  2-4 pm

          Related Papers:

Adler, N.E. & Stewart, J. (2010) Health disparities across the lifespan: Meaning, methods and mechanisms. Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1186; 5-23. Adler & Stewart (2010).pdf

Adler, N.E. & Stewart, J. (2009) Reducing obesity: Motivating action without blaming the victim. Millbank Quarterly, 87, 49-70. Adler & Stewart (2009).pdf  

Host: Jeffrey Spielberg

 

  • February 27:  Samuel McClure, Stanford University

          Title:  Decision Neuroscience: The Neural Mechanisms of Choice

          Location:  9 Durant Hall

          Time:  2-4 pm

Related Papers: 

McClure, S.M., Laibson, D.I., Loewenstein, G., & Cohen, J.D. (2004). Separate neural systems value immediate and delayed monetary rewards. Science, 306, 503-507.  McClure_Laibson_Loewenstien_Cohen_2004.pdf

Rangel, A., Carmerer, C., & Montague, P.R. (2008). A framework for studying the neurobiology of value-based decision making. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 9, 545-556. Rangel_Camerer_Montague_2008.pdf

Host: Jeffrey Spielberg

 

  • Tuesday, March 6:  George Loewenstein, Carnegie Mellon University * 

          *** Note, this talk will be held on a Tuesday rather than Monday and in a different location 

          Title:  Behavioral Economics and Incentives in Health Care

          Location:  Wells Fargo Room, Haas School of Business

          Time:  2-4 pm

          Related Papers:    

 Loewenstein, G. and Haisley, E. (2008). The economist as therapist: Methodological issues raised by “light” paternalism. In A. Caplin and A. Schotter (Eds.), Foundations of Positive and Normative Economics, volume 1 in the Handbook of Economic Methodologies, Oxford, England: Oxford University Press. EconomistAsTherapist.pdf

     John, L., Loewenstein, G., Troxel, A., Norton, L., Fassbender, J. & Volpp, K. (2011).  Financial Incentives for Extended Weight Loss: A Randomized, Controlled Trial.  Journal of General Internal Medicine, 26, 621–6loewenstein.pdf

 

Host: Ayala Arad

 

  • March 12:  Laurence Steinberg, Temple University *  

          Title:  A Social Neuroscience Perspective on Adolescent Risk-Taking

          Location:  9 Durant Hall

          Time:  2-4 pm

          Related Papers:

Steinberg, L. (2010). A dual systems model of adolescent risk-taking. Developmental Psychobiology, 52, 216-224. Steinberg (2010).pdf

Albert, D., & Steinberg, L. (2011). Judgment and decision making in adolescence. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 21, 211-224. Albert & Steinberg (2011).pdf

Host: Claudia M. Haase

 

  • March 19:  Don Moore, UC-Berkeley

          Title:  Is Overconfidence a Positive Illusion?

          Location:  9 Durant Hall

          Time:  2-4 pm

          Related Papers: 

          Moore, D. A. & Healy, P. J. (2008). The trouble with overconfidence. Psychological Review, 115, 502-517. Moore Healy 2008.pdf

Armor, D.A., & Taylor, S.E. (1998). Situated optimism: Specific outcome expectancies and self-regulation. In M. P. Zanna (Ed.), Advances in experimental social psychology (Vol. 30, pp. 309-379). New York: Academic Press.Armor Taylor 1998.pdf  

Host: Ayala Arad

 

  • April 2:  Ariel Rubinstein, Tel Aviv University and New York University

          Title:  A Personal Journey in the Wonderland of Neuroeconomics

          Location:  9 Durant Hall

          Time:  2-4 pm

          Related Papers: 

          Arieli, A., Ben-Ami, Y., & Rubinstein, A. (2011). Tracking Decision Makers under Uncertainty. American Economic Journal: Microeconomics, 3, 68–76

eye tracking 2011.pdf

          Rubinstein, A. (2007). Instinctive and cognitive reasoning: a study of response times. Economic Journal117, 1243–1259. response time.pdf

Host: Claudia M. Haase

 

  • April 9:  Eduardo Andrade, UC-Berkeley 

          Title:  The Role of Emotion in Decision Making

          Location:  9 Durant Hall

          Time:  2-4 pm

          Related Papers:

             Andrade, E. B. & Ho, T.-H. (2009). Gaming Emotions in Social Interactions. Journal of Consumer Research, 36, 539-551. Andrade&Ho2009.pdf

Andrade, E. B. & Cohen, J. B. (2007). Affect-Based Evaluation and Regulation as Mediators of Behavior: The Role of Affect in Risk-Taking, Helping and Eating Patterns. In Do Emotions Help or Hurt Decision Making: A Hedgefoxian Perspective, Eds. Kathleen Vohs, Roy Baumeister, and George Loewenstein. New York, NY: Russel Sage, (pp. 35-68). Andrade and Cohen2007.pdf

Host: Ayala Arad

 

  • April 16:  Emily Ozer, UC-Berkeley

          Title:  TBA

          Location:  9 Durant Hall

          Time:  2-4 pm

          Related Papers:  TBA

Host: Jeffrey Spielberg

 

  • April 23:  Discussion

          Location:  9 Durant Hall

          Time:  2-4 pm

          Related Papers:  TBA 

 

Contact

 

  • Instructor:

Robert W. Levenson (boblev@socrates.berkeley.edu)

  • Postdoc organizers:

Ayala Arad (ayala_arad@haas.berkeley.edu); Claudia M. Haase (claudia.haase@berkeley.edu); Jeffrey Spielberg (jspielb2@gmail.com)

 

 

Picture: (c) Jean Kirsten, www.j-kirsten.de

Behaviors such as overeating, smoking, drinking, physical inactivity, or excessive risk taking are often difficult to change, and changing such behaviors can lead to substantial improvements in well-being and health. We will explore factors involved in behavior change from a broad multidisciplinary perspective. This class provides a rare and exciting opportunity for students to meet leading scholars from different fields (psychology, economics, business, public health, neuroscience) on and off the Berkeley campus who will present their work as it relates to the study of behavior change. Topics of interest include emotion, motivation, cognition, decision-making, well-being, health, and social networks with a special developmental focus on adolescence and late life. Speakers will give a presentation that will be open to the public followed by an in-depth discussion limited to the class. Readings will include those related to each speaker’s work and that provide a background understanding of the topic. Students will prepare discussion questions for each speaker.

 

Comments (0)

You don't have permission to comment on this page.